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Robo-advisory firms often build client portfolios with exchange-traded funds (ETFs) and mutual funds.  This makes practical sense – these instruments allow advisers to efficiently meet a wide range of client investment objectives.  Nevertheless, as mentioned in our last post, the SEC’s Division of Exams (EXAMS) has made it a priority this year to focus

Word-of-mouth is still one of the best ways to attract business.  Investors, whether new or seasoned, consistently look to the experiences of previous customers or talk to someone they trust before they hire a financial adviser.  As a result, posting great reviews and compensating others to make recommendations continues to be a key part of

If there was ever a reason to follow Josh’s advice to involve compliance early in building out the functionality of your robo-adviser, the recordkeeping requirements of the Advisers Act are it.  As Josh mentioned in his post, Advisers Act Rule 204-2 imposes extensive recordkeeping requirements that you’ll want to be familiar with from the

When it comes to trading in your firm’s own investment accounts (proprietary trading), it’s never cherry-picking season.  Instead, when allocating investment opportunities, you should follow the golden rule – treat your clients like you want to be treated.

What does this mean?  As an investment adviser, your fiduciary duty requires you to allocate securities and

To date, we have covered a myriad of topics designed to help you get your firm off the ground, focusing primarily on issues like registration, licensing, advertising, disclosure, and communicating and contracting with clients.  These critical issues have one thing in common – they all involve working with folks outside your firm. Today, we kick